Resume Myths Series #4: Resume Keywords

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Resume Myths Series #4: Resume Keywords

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Every two to three days, there are more than one billion* tweets sent to the Twittersphere! According to one source, more than 50% of U.S. recruiters** tweet. Top companies, such as Starbucks, UPS, Penske and Enterprise, are using a third-party vendor to post all of their jobs to Twitter. So, why are you still apprehensive about diving in?

Some tech-savvy and eager job seekers are already jumping in — feet first — to Twitter. They are using this super-micro-blogging-platform-slash-search-engine to chat with employers, gather career advice, find job listings and research companies. Not only could you tweet your way to a fab new gig, you could meet a lot of really great people along the way … but how?

EFFECTIVELY USING TWITTER IN YOUR JOB SEARCH

Search for jobs or internships. While there are many hashtags (that funny pound sign before words) to try out, here are a few to start with: #jobs #joblistings #hiring #entrylevel #USAjobs #DCjobs #salesjobs #prjobs #internships #careers

Use the advanced search option. By using this relatively new feature, job seekers can narrow their search to find individual recruiters, companies or job opportunities. Entering keyword searches such as “Java Jobs,” “Social Media Jobs,” or “Graphic Designer Jobs” result in people to follow and postings to apply to.

Follow company career handles. Hundreds — heck, maybe thousands — of companies like @GEICOCareers^ @GECareers @FordCareers @IntuitCareers @attJOBS share photos, videos, job postings and chat via Twitter. Read what they are offering, @ message them with a question or RT a post to get their attention.

Follow your alma mater. Lots of U.S. universities have Twitter handles and share what’s happening on campus. Dig a little deeper and you may be able to find a handle for the undergraduate, MBA or alumni career center, too. @NYUWasserman, @CareerSU and @UCRCareerCenter are great schools that “get” how important social is to the job search.

Tweet your LinkedIn profile. Once you’ve identified and engaged potential companies or recruiters, tweet a link to your profile. Spark their interest in you, and inquire about job leads or ask to set up an informational call.

Participate in chats. Several times a week, there are recruiters and employers chatting-up-a-storm in hopes of sharing information and connecting with job seekers. On Monday nights there are #internpro (9 pm ET) and #jobhuntchat (10 pm ET), Tuesday night is #Resuchat (8 pm ET), Thursday is “open mic chat” #OMCchat (7 pm ET), and Fridays at noon is #HFchat.

Subscribe to geo-targeted job feeds. Services such as TweetMyJobs, SimplyHired, Indeed, JobCrank and BuddingUp post jobs to Twitter. Do a little research and subscribe to feeds that match what you are looking for in a job.

Follow reputable tweeps.  There are many genuinely good people on Twitter that share excellent job seeker content, including @Blogging4Jobs, @InternMatch, @YouTern, @BrazenCareerist, @careersherpa, @AnneMessenger, @career_cloud, @kufarms, @chaimshapiro, @CyndyTrivella, and … well … me.

Stay in touch with recruiters. If you’ve met a hiring manager during a career fair or a recruiter at a networking event, ask if they are on Twitter. Follow them, tweet occasionally and stay connected to a real person.

When I first joined Twitter, I was very passive. I was unsure of myself, the Twitiquette and had no idea how I was supposed to “engage” people. But, honestly, I think that I was over-thinking it. The best way, that I found, to get over my shwyness was to first observe some career-related chats before making a splash. So if you are still not ready to swim in the deep end, sit off to the side and bask in the information that’s already available to you on Twitter.

How has Twitter helped you in your job search? Share your tips or story below.

 

*Mediabistro’s AllTwitter, January 2013
^Shameless plug … I have been a GEICO employee for 10 years
**Time.com, July 2012

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